• Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Sonja Zobel
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Katharina Halus, Sonja Zobel und Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Katharina Halus und Sonja Zobel
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe, Katharina Halus und Sonja Zobel
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Katharina Halus, Sonja Zobel und Janina Raspe
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Katharina Halus
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Katharina Halus
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Sonja Zobel
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Janina Raspe, Sonja Zobel und Katharina Halus
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Katharina Halus, Janina Raspe und Sonja Zobel
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Katharina Halus
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger
  • Sonja Zobel und Josef Vesely
    © Anna-Maria Löffelberger

Steppenwolf

Hermann Hesse

In cooperation with Kunstbox Seekirchen

Premiere Seekirchen (Kulturhaus Emailwerk Seekirchen) 14/09/2018 / Premiere Salzburg (Kammerspiele) 18/09/2018

Synopsis

Harry Haller, a highly educated man who suffers from gout and is weary of the world, feels torn between his “two natures”: the profound thinker and scholar, who loves Mozart and Goethe, and the anarchistic, wild “wolf of the steppes”, driven by an irrepressible hunger for freedom. His life has lost all orderly structure. He has given up his job and spends his time reading, smoking and drinking, endlessly ranting against the bourgeois world, mediocrity and the complacency of the ordinary, even though he secretly yearns for the order and tidiness of an ordinary life.

Harry has just moved into his new abode, an attic room in a middle class apartment building, and he has decided that he will commit suicide by the time he turns 50. But then his life takes an unexpected and crucial turn: wandering through the city he discovers the mysterious “magic theatre”, which seems to be just the place for him, and meets androgynous Hermine, who shakes him out of his depressed torpor. She teaches him to dance and introduces him to Maria, who is very talented when it comes to love. And handsome jazz musician Pablo, who always has just the right drug at hand, induces Harry to take further steps towards discovering his true self…

Published in 1927, the novel “Steppenwolf” established Herman Hesse’s (1877–1962) global renown as an author. The text blends the unrest of the interwar years, the premonition of an upcoming war, a desperate hunger for life and the technologisation of the world exemplified in the rise of the radio and the automobile with a radical self-analysis – which is not without hope of salvation and of the overcoming of the self through art and laughter.

Johannes Ender, whose adaptation of “Werther” drew record audiences in the 2017/2018 season, again collaborates with stage and costume designer Hannah Landes to create adequate worlds for the rich imagery of the novel in the intimate spaces of the studio theatres Emailwerk Seekirchen and Salzburger Kammerspiele.

Reviews

"Dieser Mann ist innerlich zerrissen. Ein unbezähmbarer Steppenwolf will er sein und mietet sich doch in kleinbürgerlichen Verhältnissen ein. An die äußerste Konsequenz, den Selbstmord, wagt er sich dann doch nicht heran.

Die sinnsuchende und freiheitsliebende 68er-Generation entdeckte Harry Haller, den Protagonisten des Romans „Der Steppenwolf“. Weitere 50 Jahre später danach zeigt das Salzburger Landestheater dieses Werk in dramatisierter Form.

Regisseur Johannes Ender hat sich bereits vor einem Jahr einem weiteren Lebensmüden der Literaturgeschichte gewidmet, Goethes Werther.

Zunächst erscheint Janina Raspe, die im circensisch-expressionistischen Stile der 1920er Jahr performt. Hannah Landes, die Ausstatterin und Puppenbildnerin, erzielt aus kleinen Dingen große Wirkung. Katharina Halus und Sonja Zobel kreieren aus Licht und leblosem Material viele der weiteren Figuren des Romans.“

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